Discovering Whole Foods Nutrition: Yevo Foods

430x235_Yevo_fuit-n-veg-bucketLooking for a way to prevent disease and slow down aging? One key tactic is to eat more wholefoods. Wholefoods are foods that are closest to their natural state and that means they give us more nutrients than packaged or processed foods. None of us are perfect and we live in the modern world, so obviously every meal and snack we have will not be made up of wholefoods. However, if we aim for them to make up 60 to 75 per cent of our diet it will go a long way towards preventing disease and slowing down aging. So what should we eat? Wholefoods include unprocessed fruit and vegetables; whole grains (millet, brown rice, oats, rye, wholewheat, buckwheat, quinoa and cornmeal); beans and legumes (including lentils, chickpeas and kidney beans); and nuts and seeds. Wholefoods of animal origin include eggs, small whole fish, seafood (including crustaceans), poultry and red meat such as beef, lamb, pork and veal.

Eating foods that have not been processed ensures you consume the maximum amount of nutrients, in the correct proportions.
Nutrient-rich wholefoods contain a wide variety of nutrients in one food. These nutrients include vitamins, minerals, photo-nutrients, essential fatty acids and fiber. Wholefoods are also rich in some substances that cannot be synthesized in the body and therefore have to be obtained through diet.

Consider the amino acid valine. Yevo Food has 1338mg of Valine in every serving .Amino acids are the substances that make up the protein for every cell in our body. Our bodies use 22 amino acids. Nine of these cannot be synthesized within our bodies and must be supplied through diet. Valine is one of these essential amino acids. It is needed for muscle metabolism and tissue repair. bowl-w-boxesWholefood sources include brown rice, beans, beef, mushrooms, peanuts and soybeans. Many nutrients in food work together to ensure the healthy functioning of our bodies. Eating food in its natural state ensures we benefit from these synergies. The amino acid Tryptophan, for example, is the precursor to the “happy” hormone serotonin, but it needs B vitamins in order for it to be converted into serotonin. Yevo Oatmeal has ALL the B vitamins plus 302mg of tryptophan in every serving

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Wholefoods are also rich in antioxidants, which neutralize free radicals. An overload of free radicals has been linked to problems such as heart disease. Just say no to processed foods. Processed foods are often filled with chemicals and preservatives that give food flavor and a long shelf life. These chemicals can build up, causing our body’s  systems to become sluggish and even toxic. Eating this way starves bodies of nutrients, which is why people who eat a lot of processed foods are always hungry.

Let’s take a look at a few examples of wholefoods versus their packaged counterparts.

Instant oats vs traditional oats: Instant oats usually have the oat bran – the layer of the grain beneath the hull – removed. Many vitamins and much of the fiber found in oats are contained within the bran, so the processing removes many of its nutritional properties.
Whole fruit and vegetables vs packaged juice: Most fruit and vegetable juice has been stripped of its fiber content. After it has been juiced, a fruit becomes a concentrated source of sugar and will elevate blood-sugar levels far more quickly than the whole fruit.
For example, a 120-calorie apple contains 24 grams of sugar, while 120 calories of apple juice contains 30 grams of sugar. Juicers often also require the pulp and skin of the fruit to be removed, depriving you of flavonoids and antioxidants. A packaged juice will also often have additional sugar, as well as chemicals and preservatives.
Canned or frozen fish vs fresh fish: Essential fatty acids in fish are often reduced in the processing or packaging process. Omega-3 fatty acids assist with immune, nervous system, cardiovascular and reproductive functions. They may also help alleviate depression.

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Whole Foods are not just vegetables, fruits and grains

Yevo seeks to change the way America gets it’s Nutrients

Usually, the term whole foods is confined to vegetables, fruits, and grains.  But any dietitian will agree that eating a skinless chicken breast is preferable to eating processed chicken nuggets. One problem with processed food is that, during manufacture, many healthy nutrients are removed. For instance, when whole grains are refined, the bran and the coat of the grain are often removed.  Some nutrients are lost, most significantly fiber.  Then, during the enrichment process, nutrients may be artificially added back in.  But even after enrichment, the final product is likely to be less nutritious than the whole grains you started with. The Synergy of Healthy Whole Foods and Yevo 43 Essential Nutrients is amazing. One of the biggest advantages of eating whole foods is that you’re getting the natural synergy of all of these nutrients together. We know that when they’re eaten in food, they have all sorts of health benefits.  But studies of the single vitamins and minerals in supplement form have not shown the same success.  Why? It could be the natural combination and interaction of all of these different phytochemicals and proteins that give a food its health benefit. Trying to extract a single nutrient and take it by itself may not work.

There’s another thing.  We simply don’t know all of the nutrients in a food that make it healthy. That’s Why Yevo has listened to the World Health Organization’s findings that there are 43 Essential Nutrients that Your body must have each and every day or children do not grow up as big or as smart. Nutrition science is always discovering new components of foods, things that we didn’t know are there. Many of them are not even available in supplement form. If we don’t know what they are, we obviously can’t synthesize them.  The trouble with synthetic nutrients are that they are not in a form easily recognized by the body as food and absorbed. Instead some 70% or vitamin and mineral suppliments simply pass through and go out into the toilet.

Avoiding Additives in Food is important. The nutrients lost during refinement are not the only disadvantage of eating processed foods.  What’s added can also be a problem.  A lot of health conscious people are wary of the preservatives and chemicals that are added to processed and manufactured foods.  You know — the ones with the scary-sounding eight-syllable names.  But in fact, some of the worst food additives are household words. The most worrisome additives are not the preservatives, It’s the salt, sugar, and saturated and trans fats. While there’s been a lot of attention paid to the risks of trans fats in recent years, salt is gravely underestimated.

As a country, we eat way too much salt, which is closely associated with high blood pressure and numerous other health problems. With all of the extra fat and sugar in processed foods, the calories can quickly add up.  That leads to weight gain.  But eating more healthy whole foods may actually help you maintain or lose weight.  The natural fiber in many vegetables, fruits, and grains may fill you up without adding many calories, but Yevo Foods are designed to give you everything your body was designed to need and use to repair and maintain itself.

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Why Should You eat Food that is not denatured?

The denaturing of proteins

One of the most important scientific arguments in favor of totally raw diets, and uncooked foods in general, is that the proteins in foods are denatured by the high temperatures of cooking. Both the living organism and its enzymes are inhabited by a vital principle or life energy which is separate and distinct from caloric energy. The enzyme complex harbors a protein carrier inhabited by a vital energy factor. How do we know if something is alive?  The best test I have come up with is that it must eat, excrete, and reproduce.  Another quality might be the ability to self-repair.  Clearly, enzymes, which are merely proteins, do not manifest any of these properties unique to living beings.

Yevo International has obtained one of only two machines in the world that can completely dry food without denaturing it. This patented proprietary technique allows the food to have nearly the same biological signature as fresh foods.

Proteins are composed of strings of amino acids arranged in quite specific orders, like beads on a string .  This linear structure is the primary structure.  However, these strings of amino acids are then folded upon themselves by relatively weak hydrogen bonds (proton bonds) into complex three-dimensional structures having secondary, tertiary, and quaternary “higher order” structures.  The biological activity of molecules is determined by these higher three-dimensional structures and how they physically fit into the three-dimensional structures of other biomolecules.  Since strict physical conformance of the enzyme to the food protein it acts upon (say, in digesting it) must be satisfied for the bioactivity, this tight complementary relationship is frequently referred to as a “lock and key” model.  Destroy these higher structures and the chemical most probably becomes biologically inactive: bend the key and it will not open the lock.  Denaturation is a process that alters a protein’s native conformation and biological activity.  If the tertiary or quaternary structure of a protein is altered, e.g., by such physical factors as extremes of temperature, changes in pH, or variations in salt concentration, the protein is said to be denatured; it usually exhibits reduction or loss of biological activity. Chip Marsland has developed over 100 meals of whole UN-Denatured dehydrated foods.


Protein denaturation

Many foods contain proteins, such as meat, fish, eggs, vegetables, nuts and pulses. Proteins are large molecules, composed of strands of amino acids, which are linked together in specific sequences by the formation of peptide bonds. Proteins form different 3-dimensional structures, by the folding and subsequent bonding of the amino acid strands. Generally, the bonds which link the folded amino acid strands together (mostly hydrogen bonds), are much weaker than the strong peptide bonds forming the strands. During cooking, the heat causes the proteins to vibrate violently, which results in the breakage of the weak hydrogen bonds holding the amino acid strands in place. Ultimately, the protein unravels to re-take its initial form of amino acid strands.

The denaturation of protein molecules in foods usually causes a substantial change to the texture of the product. For example, egg white is composed of two key proteins; ovotransferrin and ovalbumin. As the egg white is heated, ovotransferrin begins to denature first, entangling and forming new bonds with the ovalbumin. As the temperature increases, ovalbumin then starts to denature, unraveling and forming new bonds with the ovotransferrin, until denaturation and rearrangement of the protein molecules are complete. In this case, the rearrangement of the protein molecules results in the change of a runny, fluid texture to a rigid, firm texture.

Conversely, protein denaturization can also cause the formation of softer textures. For example, the protein collagen, which is the major component of the connective tissue in meat, has a tough, chewy texture. However, during cooking, the weak hydrogen bonds are broken and the protein begins to decompose and react with water molecules to form gelatine. This tenderizes the meat, giving it a softer, more palatable texture. Yevo Foods Never undergo protein denaturation. Any foods containing protein e.g., meat, fish, eggs, pulses. The cooking methods that may result in protein denaturation are boiling, frying, grilling, roasting, steaming and baking. Foods containing the polysaccharide starch, such as corn flour and rice flour, are often used to create and / or thicken sauces. This is because the cooking of these foods causes a process known as starch gelatinisation. The starch granule is made up of two polysaccharide components, known as amylose and amylopectin. Amylose has a linear chain of glucose units, whilst amylopectin has a branched structure of glucose units. When cooked in water, the starch granules absorb water and swell. At the same time, amylose leaches out of the granules and bonds to form organised lattice structures, which trap the water molecules causing the thickening of the mixture. Any foods containing starch e.g., potatoes, wheat, rice, pasta. The cooking methods that may result in starch gelatinization is boiling.

Many plant foods, in particular vegetables, maintain their rigidity by the incorporation of polysaccharides such as cellulose and pectin in the plant walls. As with the degradation of starch, cellulose and pectin can also be broken down into their monosaccharide constituents during cooking, resulting in the substantial softening of foods containing these polysaccharides. Any foods containing polysaccharides such as cellulose and pectin e.g., vegetables. The cooking methods that may result in polysaccharide degradation are boiling, frying, grilling, roasting and baking.


Best Reasons Why You Need Whole Foods

Fruit and vegetables not only contain your household nutrients like vitamin C, vitamin E, calcium, and iron, but they are abundant in phytonutrients. In fact, there are well over 10,000 known phytonutrients, and the best part about it is scientists at Yevo are discovering more and more all the time (some estimates say there may be 20,000+). These nutrients are what give fruit and vegetables their intense color and phenomenal nutrition, and has them coined as “Mother Nature’s most perfect foods.” Phytonutrients can be defined as nutrients that have been scientifically proven to provide health benefits. “Phyto” in Greek means plants, and phytonutrients fall into their own category because they are not related to fats, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, or minerals. These nutrients allow for optimal cellular function and communication. When our cells are communicating effectively, the proper sequence of enzymatic reactions take place. This all leads to biochemical reactions creating healthier tissues and organ systems, detoxification of foreign substances, a strong immune system, and muscles that will perform when called upon.

Phytonutrients work together in synergy just like an orchestra. Supplement companies have tried to mimic Mother Nature and are always touting the effects of their newest “green” formula (pills and powders alike). I must give a buyer-beware warning though, as have I rarely seen a nutrition facts label on these products. They usually sport a supplement facts label and thus, the FDA does not regulate these products like food and they likely will not have the same benefits physiologically as food. The key to watch out for with these type of supplements is how much isolated product is in them. A cocktail of vitamins and minerals put into a pill, even if it does contain a handful of whole food sources, does not act the same way broccoli or carrots do in the body. These supplements are essentially missing key co-factors or enzymes. To allude to the orchestra analogy, it is like taking out the string section and expecting the same sound. If you feel you need to supplement, ideally you would invest your money into products known via research to be bioavailable, meaning they can be used by the body to create nutrient-dense plasma

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Are Yevo Foods Organic?

Organic foods: Are they safer? More nutritious?

What’s the real difference between organic foods and their traditionally grown counterparts when it comes to nutrition, safety and price? Once found only in health food stores, organic food is now a regular feature at most supermarkets. And that’s created a bit of a dilemma in the produce aisle. On one hand, you have a conventionally grown apple. On the other, you have one that’s organic. Both apples are firm, shiny and red. Both provide vitamins and fiber, and both are free of fat, sodium and cholesterol. The word “organic” refers to the way farmers grow and process agricultural products, such as fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy products and meat. Organic farming practices are designed to encourage soil and water conservation and reduce pollution. Farmers who grow organic produce don’t use conventional methods to fertilize and control weeds. Yevo Foods are Proposition 26 compliant, which means no pesticide, herbicides, poisons or heavy metals. Yevo International will be releasing a line of dehydrated, whole organic foods soon. Examples of organic farming practices include using natural fertilizers to feed soil and plants, and using crop rotation or mulch to manage weeds. Organic or not? Check the label.The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has established an organic certification program that requires all organic foods to meet strict government standards. These standards regulate how such foods are grown, handled and processed.

Any product labeled as organic must be USDA certified. Only producers who sell less than $5,000 a year in organic foods are exempt from this certification; however, they’re still required to follow the USDA’s standards for organic foods. If a food bears a USDA Organic label, it means it’s produced and processed according to the USDA standards. The seal is voluntary, but many organic producers use it.
Products certified 95 percent or more organic may display this USDA seal. Products that are completely organic — such as fruits, vegetables, eggs or other single-ingredient foods — are labeled 100 percent organic and can carry the USDA seal. Foods that have more than one ingredient, such as breakfast cereal, can use the USDA organic seal plus the following wording, depending on the number of organic ingredients:  100 percent organic. To use this phrase, products must be either completely organic or made of all organic ingredients. Organic? Products must be at least 95 percent organic to use this term.

Products that contain at least 70 percent organic ingredients may say “made with organic ingredients” on the label, but may not use the seal. Foods containing less than 70 percent organic ingredients can’t use the seal or the word “organic” on their product labels. They can include the organic items in their ingredient list, however. Do ‘organic’ and ‘natural’ mean the same thing? No, “natural” and “organic” are not interchangeable terms. You may see “natural” and other terms such as “all natural,” “free-range” or “hormone-free” on food labels. These descriptions must be truthful, but don’t confuse them with the term “organic.” Only foods that are grown and processed according to USDA organic standards can be labeled organic.